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articles:a_matter_of_risk [2019/11/17 18:59]
rrandall [ISO/IEC Directives-Part 1. Annex L (originally Annex SL)]
articles:a_matter_of_risk [2019/11/17 19:03] (current)
rrandall [Conclusion]
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 ===== Conclusion ===== ===== Conclusion =====
  
-One must wonder why ISO is so obsessed with redefining ​the word "​risk"​?+One must wonder why ISO is so obsessed with ignoring the etymology of the word "​risk"​, and insisting upon redefining the word.
  
 Upon examining the "​Bibliography"​ section of many ISO documents promoting non-traditional definitions of "​risk",​ we see that they only reference ISO or IEC documents (IEC ([[https://​www.iec.ch|International Electrotechnical Commission]]) is a sister organization of ISO): Upon examining the "​Bibliography"​ section of many ISO documents promoting non-traditional definitions of "​risk",​ we see that they only reference ISO or IEC documents (IEC ([[https://​www.iec.ch|International Electrotechnical Commission]]) is a sister organization of ISO):
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   * ISO Guide 73:2009 (only references other ISO & IEC documents)   * ISO Guide 73:2009 (only references other ISO & IEC documents)
  
-It quickly becomes obvious that ISO is firmly entrenched in "Not Invented Here Syndrome"​ (NIHS). [[https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Not_invented_here|Wikipedia]] describes NIHS as a stance adopted by social, corporate, or institutional cultures that avoids using or buying already existing products, research, standards, or knowledge because of their external origins and costs, such as royalties. The reasons for not wanting to use the work of others are varied, but some can include a desire to support a local economy instead of paying royalties to a foreign license-holder,​ fear of patent infringement,​ lack of understanding of the foreign work, an unwillingness to acknowledge or value the work of others, jealousy, belief perseverance,​ or forming part of a wider turf war. As a social phenomenon, this tendency can manifest itself as an unwillingness to adopt an idea or product because it originates from another culture, a form of tribalism.+It quickly becomes obvious that ISO is firmly entrenched in "//Not Invented Here Syndrome//" (NIHS). [[https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Not_invented_here|Wikipedia]] describes NIHS as a stance adopted by social, corporate, or institutional cultures that avoids using or buying already existing products, research, standards, or knowledge because of their external origins and costs, such as royalties. The reasons for not wanting to use the work of others are varied, but some can include a desire to support a local economy instead of paying royalties to a foreign license-holder,​ fear of patent infringement,​ lack of understanding of the foreign work, an unwillingness to acknowledge or value the work of others, jealousy, belief perseverance,​ or forming part of a wider turf war. As a social phenomenon, this tendency can manifest itself as an unwillingness to adopt an idea or product because it originates from another culture, a form of tribalism.